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3 KEY TECHNIQUE FAULTS TO WATCH OUT FOR AND CORRECT AT TRAINING - Mosman Netball

By Holly Brasher

Following on from the interest in our last article on the KNEE program we have highlighted some key elements to look for to improve those critical factors that have been linked to an increased risk of injury when performed badly.
 
As Physios, our trained eye is always watchful to eliminate these poor techniques demonstrated below. With some help, you can too. Be proactive and help our girls to enjoy a lifetime of sports and exercise.
 
1)     TAKE OFF & LANDING
 
GOOD
POOR
Feet shoulder width apart
Feet wider than knees
Feet facing forwards
Feet rotated outwards
Hips Bent
Hips and knees stiff/upright posture
Knees bent
Valgus knees
Knees in line with feet
Trunk collapse
Trunk stable
No use of arms
Use arms to drive movement in take-off
 
 
 
2)  DECELERATION
 
GOOD
POOR
Multiple short steps
1 large step
Hips bent
Hips and knees stiff/upright posture
Knees bent
Poor posture
Chest up
Trunk collapse
Trunk stable
 

 

 
3) CHANGE OF DIRECTION
GOOD
POOR
Hips & knees bent
Hips & knees stiff/upright posture
Small steps
Wide stance with large step
Trunk stable
Poor posture
Outside leg absorbs landing
Outside leg absorbs & drives
Inside leg drives acceleration
Inside leg absorbs & drives
Foot leads direction change
Foot not turning
 
 
   
If you have identified any of these poor techniques in your netballer then please don’t hesitate to bring them along to SquareOne Physio and we can help you build the strength, balance and awareness to improve them.
 
Lauren Gradwell and Holly Brasher are both past NSW state netball players, NSW netball Physios, Titled Sports Physiotherapists and Endorsed providers of Netball Australia’s KNEE program.
 
Call now to book an appointment on 9968 3424.
www.squareonephysio.com.au - Proud supporters of Mosman Netball 
 
   
   
   
 

 

August 3, 2017 1 Comments

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    Feel free to drop in and say hi and check them out for yourself! 

  • 3 KEY TECHNIQUE FAULTS TO WATCH OUT FOR AND CORRECT AT TRAINING - Mosman Netball
  • Following on from the interest in our last article on the KNEE program we have highlighted some key elements to look for to improve those critical factors that have been linked to an increased risk of injury when performed badly.
     
    As Physios, our trained eye is always watchful to eliminate these poor techniques demonstrated below. With some help, you can too. Be proactive and help our girls to enjoy a lifetime of sports and exercise.
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