“Growing Pains” in Young Athletes

 Is your child going through a growth spurt?

 

Are they playing a lot of sport?

 

Are they complaining of pain?

 

Unfortunately pain in young athletes is often brushed off as “growing pains.” Areas that are particularly common are the back of the ankle, front of the knee, the hip and lower back.

 

If these symptoms are persisting, the chances are that it is a growth related condition. If not treated properly these symptoms can worsen, causing increased pain and require longer periods of time off sport.

 

So why does this happen?

 

As a child’s skeleton grows, the muscular system is put on a stretch, and can become extremely tight. This increases the stress on the areas where the muscles attach into the bones.

 

Activity such as running and jumping put several times the body weight of the child through these areas, and cause significant pain and discomfort. Often with rest symptoms can settle, but will return with activity.

 “Growing Pains” In Young Athletes:

 

Is your child going through a growth spurt?

 

Are they playing a lot of sport?

 

Are they complaining of pain?

 

Unfortunately pain in young athletes is often brushed off as “growing pains.” Areas that are particularly common are the back of the ankle, front of the knee, the hip and lower back.

 

If these symptoms are persisting, the chances are that it is a growth related condition. If not treated properly these symptoms can worsen, causing increased pain and require longer periods of time off sport.

 

So why does this happen?

 

As a child’s skeleton grows, the muscular system is put on a stretch, and can become extremely tight. This increases the stress on the areas where the muscles attach into the bones.

 

Activity such as running and jumping put several times the body weight of the child through these areas, and cause significant pain and discomfort. Often with rest symptoms can settle, but will return with activity.

 

Sever’s Disease:

 

This is a condition where pain is experience in the back of the heel and Achilles region (see picture below). Tightness from the calf muscles can increase the pull through the heel, and result in pain and swelling during walking and running.


 

Osgood Schlatter Disease:

 

This is a similar condition where pain is experienced in front of the knee, around the bony bump at the top of the shin (see picture below). Tightness and pressure from the thigh and hip muscles, along with high levels of activity can cause significant pain and swelling in the area.


 

Apophysitis of the hip:

 

This condition is experienced in various areas at the hip. Muscular tightness around the hip and thigh can increase the pressure at their attachment point, resulting in pain.

 


 

What can be done to treat this?

 

Physiotherapy has proven to be hugely beneficial in rehabilitating growth related injuries such as these. A combination of hands on treatment, the correct advice, and a specific rehabilitation programme will ensure that your child receives the best management.

 

If you suspect you child is suffering from a growth related injury such as one mentioned here, or in another area get in contact with us here at Square One.