Have I a sprain or a strain?

 Yet another common question we get asked…and the answer is quite simple.

 

Sprains and strains are two types of soft tissue injury.

A sprain is a joint injury that typically involves tearing of the ligaments and joint capsule. Common sites for sprains include the thumb, ankle and wrist.

A strain is an injury to muscle or tendons. Common sites for strains include the calf, groin and

hamstring.

 

Initial first aid is important to limit the damage and encourage healing and should include rest, ice, compression with bandages and elevation (RICE) for the first 48 hours.

 

Soft tissue injuries may be sudden (acute) or get worse gradually (chronic). They can take

between two and 12 weeks to heal, depending on the injury, initial and ongoing management, and

the age and general health of the person.

 

Symptoms may include:

 Yet another common question we get asked…and the answer is quite simple.

 

Sprains and strains are two types of soft tissue injury.

A sprain is a joint injury that typically involves tearing of the ligaments and joint capsule. Common sites for sprains include the thumb, ankle and wrist.

A strain is an injury to muscle or tendons. Common sites for strains include the calf, groin and

hamstring.

 

Initial first aid is important to limit the damage and encourage healing and should include rest, ice, compression with bandages and elevation (RICE) for the first 48 hours.

 

Soft tissue injuries may be sudden (acute) or get worse gradually (chronic). They can take

between two and 12 weeks to heal, depending on the injury, initial and ongoing management, and

the age and general health of the person.

 

Symptoms may include:

Pain

Swelling

Stiffness

Reduced function. i.e. unable to run/walk

 

Degrees of severity

Acute soft tissue injuries are graded between I and III:

Grade I – some fibres are torn and the site is moderately painful and swollen, but function

and strength are mostly unaffected.

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Grade II – many fibres are torn and the site is painful and swollen, with some loss of

function and strength.

Grade III – the soft tissue is totally torn, with considerable loss of function and strength.

Grade III injuries often need surgical repair.

 

Causes

Soft tissue is made from bundles of fibres. Muscle and tendons contain specialised cells that

monitor the degree of contraction and stretch. With general use, muscles and tendons use soft

contractions to resist over-stretching. However, sudden twists or jolts can apply greater force than

the tissue can structurally withstand. The fibres overstretch beyond their capacity and tear.

Bleeding from ruptured blood vessels causes the swelling.

 

Treatment

 

A Physio can provide you with an accurate diagnosis and can formulate a treatment plan.

 

Suggestions for immediate treatment of acute sprains or strains include:

Stop your activity.

Rest the injured area.

Use ice packs every two hours, applied for 15 minutes and separated from the skin by wet

towelling.

Compress or bandage the injured site firmly, extending the wrapping from below to above.

Elevate (raise) the injured area above heart height whenever practical.

Avoid exercise, heat, alcohol and massage, which can exacerbate swelling.

 

Most soft tissue injuries take a few weeks to heal, depending on the severity of the sprain or strain

and the general health of the individual. It is important to get the correct treatment as soon after

the injury as possible to assist rapid recovery. See your Physiotherapist immediately if

function is impaired or if the pain and swelling don’t subside after a couple of days.

Treatment options may include:

Physiotherapy exercises to promote healing, strength and flexibility

Manual techniques, such as mobilisation and massage

Pain-killing medications

• Rehabilitation to return to normal levels

·         Referral for scans / specialist if the injury is severe

 

Severe injuries where the tissue has completely ruptured may need surgery to reattach the torn

pieces back together. Surgically repaired Grade III injuries will require significant physiotherapy to

regain strength and function. A short period of immobilisation can assist with the healing process

for Grade II type injuries.

 

Completing the proper rehab for a sprain and strain is important to achieve a full recovery but more importantly it prevents re-injury. The biggest risk factor of a sprain or a strain is previous injury. Don’t make the mistake and end up in the same place a few months later!

 

Written by Holly Brasher B.App.Sc. (Phty) M. Sports Physio

APA Titled Sports Physio and Practice Principal at SquareOne Physiotherapy in Bridgepoint Shopping Centre

SquareOne Physiotherapy are proud sponsors of The Mini-Mos and offer a $10 discount for all Mini-mos runners attending an initial consult.

Ph: 9968 3424