Prostate cancer and pelvic floor

Every year around 20 000 new cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed in Australia. 1 in 9 men will develop prostate cancer in their lifetime.

What is Prostate Cancer?
Prostate cancer is an abnormal growth of cells in the prostate that form a tumour. Over time, if not treated, it may spread to other organs, particularly the bones and lymph nodes, which can then be life threatening. Generally at the early and potentially curable stage, prostate cancer does not have obvious symptoms. This makes it different from other benign prostate disorders, which may result in urinary symptoms.
 
What are the symptoms of prostate cancer?
In the early stages there may be no symptoms at all. As prostate cancer develops symptoms include:
  • The need to urinate frequently, particularly at night
  • Sudden urges to urinate
  • Difficulty in starting urine flow
  • A slow interrupted flow and dribbling afterwards
  • Pain during urination or blood in the urine or semen

Every year around 20,000 new cases of Prostate cancer are diagnosed in Australia. One in 9 men will develop Prostate cancer in their lifetime.  

 
What is Prostate Cancer?
Prostate cancer is an abnormal growth of cells in the prostate that form a tumour. Over time if not treated, it may spread to other organs, particularly the bones and lymph nodes, which can then be life threatening. 
Generally at the early and potentially curable stage, prostate cancer does not have obvious symptoms. This makes it different from other benign prostate disorders, which may result in urinary symptoms.
 
What are the symptoms of prostate cancer?
In the early stages of prostate cancer, there may be no symptoms at all. As prostate cancer develops, symptoms can include:
  • The need to urinate frequently, particularly at night
  • Sudden urges to urinate 
  • Difficulty in starting urine flow, 
  • A slow interrupted flow and dribbling afterwards
  • Pain during urination or blood in the urine or semen
 
NOTE: It is important to note that these symptoms are not always signs of prostate cancer. They can also be symptoms of other common and non-life threatening prostate disorders. Men who experience these symptoms should however see their doctor immediately, to determine the cause and best treatment.
‘Prostate cancer foundation Australia’
 
See next months newsletter for what happens if surgery is required, what effect surgery has on the bladder system and how to deal with these problems.