Recovery – ensuring you maximize each training session and event

With the Sydney running season well under way it is important to get the most out of each training session and event. Even for the weekend warrior it is important to be fully recovered as quickly as possible to enable a quick return to bouts of competition or training. To maximise performance and minimize potential for injury, there are a number of specific physiological objectives in the recovery process which include: restoration of full function, neuromuscular recovery, tissue repair, resolution of muscle soreness and psychological recovery. Below are 3 easy and practical methods that can be implemented in conjunction with your training and competition to help enhance recovery:

 
1. Warm down or active recovery:
The length of warm down or active recovery following the..
 

With the Sydney running season well under way it is important to get the most out of each training session and event. Even for the weekend warrior it is important to be fully recovered as quickly as possible to enable a quick return to bouts of competition or training. To maximise performance and minimize potential for injury, there are a number of specific physiological objectives in the recovery process which include: restoration of full function, neuromuscular recovery, tissue repair, resolution of muscle soreness and psychological recovery. Below are some 3 easy and practical methods that can be implemented in conjunction with your training and competition to help enhance recovery:

 
1. Warm down or active recovery:
The length of warm down or active recovery following the conclusion of exercise varies but should range from 5-15 minutes. Active recovery has been shown to remove lactate from the circulation more quickly than does passive recovery. Following a training run or event, an active recovery would involve several minutes of low intensity running no more that 50% of the exercise intensity. This should be followed by a series of major muscle stretching and/or foam rolling. Muscles that would most benefit from stretching after a run are the calves, hamstrings, quadriceps and glutes. Each stretch should be held for at least 20 seconds.
 
2. Soft Tissue Massage
Regular soft tissue massage contributes to soft tissue recovery from intense running. Intense training causes prolonged elevation of muscle tone in both the resting and the contractile states. This is often felt as muscle ‘tightness’ by athletes and occurs during adaptation to increased volume and intensity of training. Active trigger points that result from heavy training may reduce muscle strength. These problems can impair training and competition and can progress to injury if they are not resolved.
 
3. Lifestyle Factors
Adequate rest and sleep are important in the recovery process. It has been shown that sleep loss following an event can interfere with training the following day. Furthermore, nutrition aids recovery from intense exercise by replenishing glycogen stores which are depleted with training and can impair performance. Intense exercise results in breakdown of muscle tissue and intake of protein can aid in tissue repair and enhance adaptations. Restoration of fluid balance after exercise is an important part of the recovery process. Rehydration after exercise replaces fluid loss and restores electrolyte balance.
 
Please contact SquareOne Physiotherapy should you require assistance in your preparation for an upcoming event. The SquareOne team can aid in the recovery process with appropriate exercise prescription, soft tissue releasing and massage, dry needling, foam rolling programs, and self management solutions to ensure you are adequately recovered and prepared.